You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition
and results of operations together with the unaudited financial statements and
related notes included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. This
discussion and other parts of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contain
forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, such as
statements of our plans, objectives, expectations and intentions. Our actual
results could differ materially from those discussed in these forward-looking
statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include,
but are not limited to, those discussed in the section of this Quarterly Report
on Form 10-Q entitled "Risk Factors".

Insight

We are a digital healthcare company redefining the way cardiac arrhythmias are
clinically diagnosed by combining our wearable biosensing technology with
cloud-based data analytics and deep-learning capabilities. Our goal is to be the
leading provider of ambulatory electrocardiogram ("ECG") monitoring for patients
at risk for arrhythmias. We have created a full portfolio of ambulatory cardiac
monitoring services on a unique platform, called the Zio service, which combines
an easy-to-wear and unobtrusive biosensor that can be worn for up to 14
consecutive days with powerful proprietary algorithms that distill data from
millions of heartbeats into clinically actionable information. The Zio service
consists of:

•wearable patch-based biosensors, the Zio XT and Zio AT monitors, which
continuously record and store ECG data from the patient's heartbeat for up to 14
consecutive days; while continuously recording patient ECG data, the Zio AT
service offers the option of timely transmission of patient-triggered and
automatically detected arrhythmia events data to a monitoring center for review
and reporting according to physician-selected notification criteria;

• Cloud-based analysis of recorded heart rhythms using our proprietary deep-learned algorithms;

•a final data quality assessment review by our certified cardiograph technicians; and

•An easy-to-read Zio Report, an organized summary of results that includes high-quality, clinically actionable information that is sent directly to a patient’s physician via ZioSuite and can be integrated into a patient’s electronic health record.

We receive revenue for the Zio service primarily from third-party payors, which
include commercial payors and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services
("CMS"). The remainder of our revenue comes from healthcare institutions, which
are typically hospitals or private physician practices, who purchase the Zio
service from us directly. Our revenue in the third-party commercial payor
category is primarily contracted, which means we have entered into pricing
contracts with these payors. Third-party contracted payors accounted for
approximately 55% and 62% of our revenue for the six months ended June 30, 2022
and 2021, respectively. Approximately 23% and 14% of our total revenue for the
six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, is received from CMS,
which is under established reimbursement codes. Healthcare institutions
accounted for approximately 16% and 17% of our revenue for the six months ended
June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Non-contracted third party payors and
self-pay accounted for 6% and 8% of our total revenue for the six months ended
June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively. We rely on a third-party billing
partner, XIFIN, Inc., to submit patient claims and collect from commercial
payors, certain government agencies, and patients.

Following the initial 510(k) clearance of our technology by the U.S. Food and
Drug Administration ("FDA"), we have provided the Zio service to over four
million patients and have collected over one billion hours of curated heartbeat
data. We believe the Zio service is well-positioned to penetrate an
already-established approximately $2.0 billion U.S. ambulatory cardiac
monitoring market by offering a user-friendly device to patients, actionable
information to physicians, and value to payors.

  We market our ambulatory cardiac monitoring solution in the United States
through a direct sales organization comprised of sales management, field billing
specialists, quota-carrying sales representatives, and a customer service team.
Our sales representatives focus on initial introduction into new customers,
penetration across a sales region, driving adoption within existing accounts,
and conveying our message of clinical and economic value to service line
managers, hospital administrators and other clinical departments. In addition,
we will continue exploring sales and marketing expansion opportunities in
international geographies.


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Impact of COVID-19

Beginning in mid-March 2020, we experienced decreasing levels in patient
registrations for the Zio service, which impacted our revenues during the years
ended December 31, 2021 and 2020. This decrease in revenue is due to a variety
of challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States,
including, among others:

•a reduction in medical prescriptions for our Zio service due to:

•a reduction in diagnostic testing outside of those tests related to severe
respiratory distress;
•reduction in the hours of physicians' offices and staffing shortages affecting
these offices;
•physicians and hospitals prioritizing the treatment of critically ill patients;
and
•patient reluctance to visit physician offices or hospitals for fear of
contracting COVID-19;

• the cancellation and reduction of physician attendance at medical society meetings and trade shows and our decision not to attend due to COVID-19 safety measures;

•travel restrictions and changing hospital policies that have limited our sales professionals’ access to hospitals where Zio services are ordered and where patients have historically been enrolled;

• delays in patients receiving Zio XT monitors at the end of the Zio service, with some patients not returning the device at all; and

•patients who cannot afford the Zio service due to job loss, dismissal, reduced hours, or who are concerned about continuing insurance medical.

In the first quarter of 2022, we reopened our offices and some groups of employees began to return to work in our offices across United States. Appropriate social distancing techniques and other measures at our facilities have been implemented for employees who have returned to work.

While hospital systems and healthcare facilities shifted their focus and
resources to treating COVID-19 patients and combating the spread of the
coronavirus, we have adapted our service to meet the immediate needs of
physicians, customers, and patients and significantly increased the utilization
of our home enrollment service, which allows patients to receive and wear the
single-use Zio device without going to a healthcare facility.

Our remote work arrangements resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent
decision to pursue a sublease for our San Francisco headquarters caused us to
recognize an impairment on our right of use asset and related leasehold
improvements and furniture and fixtures and we believe we may incur additional
impairment charges related to our real property lease agreements.

Components of operating results

Revenue

The majority of our revenue comes from providing our Zio service to customers of United States. We derive revenue from providing our Zio service primarily from contracted third-party payers, CMS and healthcare facilities. A small percentage of our revenue comes from non-contract third-party payers.

We recognize revenue on an accrual basis based on estimates of the amount that
will ultimately be realized, which is the difference between the amount
submitted for payment and the amount received. These estimates require
significant judgment by management. In determining the amount to accrue for a
delivered report, and Zio service provided, we consider factors such as: (i)
claim payment history from both payors and patient out-of-pocket costs; (ii)
payor coverage; (iii) whether there is a contract between the payor or
healthcare institution and the Company; (iv) historical amount received for the
service; and (v) any current developments or changes that could impact
reimbursement and healthcare institution payments.

We are subject to similar seasonality to other companies in our field, as doctor and patient vacations tend to affect enrollment in the Zio service more during the summer months and during the holiday season. calendar compared to other periods of the year. Revenues may be impacted by the outcome of auctions with contractual and non-contractual payers,

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as well as changes in the CMS reimbursement rates. Clinical capacity limitations
may also restrict our ability to complete the performance obligations to achieve
revenue recognition.

Revenue Cost and Gross Margin

Cost of revenue includes direct labor, material costs, equipment and
infrastructure expenses, device scrap and loss, amortization of internal-use
software, allocated overhead, and shipping and handling. Direct labor includes
payroll and personnel-related costs including stock-based compensation involved
in manufacturing, clinical data curation, and customer service. Material costs
include both the disposable materials costs of the Zio monitors and amortization
of the reusable printed circuit board assemblies ("PCBAs"). Each Zio XT monitor
includes a PCBA, and each Zio AT monitor includes a PCBA and gateway board, the
cost of which is amortized over the anticipated number of uses of the board. We
expect the cost of revenue to increase in absolute dollars as our revenue
increases due to increased direct labor, direct materials, and variable
spending, partially offset by economies of scale in relation to fixed costs such
as overhead, depreciation and amortization, and facilities costs.

We calculate gross margin as gross profit divided by revenue. Our gross margin
has been and will continue to be affected by a variety of factors, including
increased contracting with third-party payors and institutional providers. We
have in the past been able to increase our pricing as third-party payors become
more familiar with the benefits of the Zio service and move to contracted
pricing arrangements. We expect to continue to decrease the cost of revenue per
device by obtaining volume purchase discounts for our material costs,
implementing scan-time algorithm and process improvements, automating
manufacturing assembly and packaging, and software-driven and other workflow
enhancements to reduce labor costs. These decreases have been offset by
increases to materials and electronics components pricing, labor rates, shipping
rates, depreciation and amortization of investments, and increases in the
general level of inflation.

Although a large majority of our commercial customers have renewed their
contracts for the Zio XT service since the establishment of the Category I codes
on January 1, 2021 matching to pre-existing rates, if we are unsuccessful in
improving the Medicare rates, we believe that commercial rates may begin to be
more negatively impacted, which would have a negative impact on our gross
margins.

Research and development costs

We expense research and development costs as they are incurred. Research and
development expenses include payroll and personnel-related costs, including
stock-based compensation, consulting services, clinical studies, laboratory
supplies and allocated facility overhead costs. We expect our research and
development costs to increase in absolute dollars as we hire additional
personnel to develop new product and service offerings, product enhancements and
clinical evidence.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Our sales and marketing expenses consist of payroll and personnel-related costs,
including stock-based compensation, sales commissions, travel expenses,
consulting, public relations costs, direct marketing, tradeshow and promotional
expenses and allocated facility overhead costs.

Our general and administrative expenses consist primarily of payroll and
personnel-related costs for executive, finance, legal and administrative
personnel, including stock-based compensation. Other significant expenses
include professional fees for legal and accounting services, consulting fees,
recruiting fees, bad debt expense, third-party patient claims processing fees
and travel expenses.

Impairment and restructuring charges

Our impairment and restructuring expenses consist of impairment charges on our
San Francisco right-of-use asset and severance charges in connection with our
2022 restructuring plan.

Interest Expense

Interest expense is attributable to borrowings under our loan agreements. See Note 8. Debt, for more information on our loan agreements.

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Other income, net

Other income, net, consists primarily of interest income which consists of interest received on our cash equivalents and investments.

Operating results

Comparison of the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

                                                         Three Months Ended June 30,
                                                           2022                  2021            $ Change             % Change

                                                                                 (dollars in thousands)
Revenue                                              $     102,051           $  81,278          $ 20,773                      26  %
Cost of revenue                                             31,806              25,995             5,811                      22  %
Gross profit                                                70,245              55,283            14,962                      27  %
Gross margin                                                    69   %              68  %
Operating expenses:
Research and development                                    11,945               9,606             2,339                      24  %
Selling, general and administrative                         81,751              62,669            19,082                      30  %

Total operating expenses                                    93,696              72,275            21,421                      30  %
Loss from operations                                       (23,451)            (16,992)           (6,459)                     38  %
Interest expense                                              (482)               (307)             (175)                     57  %
Other income, net                                               69                  55                14                      25  %
Loss before income taxes                                   (23,864)            (17,244)           (6,620)                     38  %
Income tax provision                                            33                 116               (83)                    (72) %
Net loss                                             $     (23,897)          $ (17,360)         $ (6,537)                     38  %


Revenue
Revenue increased $20.8 million, or 26%, to $102.1 million during the three
months ended June 30, 2022, from $81.3 million during the three months ended
June 30, 2021. The increase in revenue was primarily attributable to an increase
in volume of Zio services provided as a result of increased demand and improved
CMS reimbursement rates, partially offset by a decrease in adjudication
performance with contracted and non-contracted payors.

Revenue cost and gross profit

Cost of revenue increased $5.8 million, or 22%, to $31.8 million during the
three months ended June 30, 2022, from $26.0 million during the three months
ended June 30, 2021. The increase in cost of revenue was primarily due to
increased Zio service volume and higher costs associated with our new operating
facility in Cypress, California that commenced operation in September 2021.

Gross profit increased $15.0 million to $70.2 million during the three months
ended June 30, 2022 from $55.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021.
The increase in profit was primarily due to increased volume and average selling
price, partially offset by increases in cost per unit.

Research and development costs

Research and development expenses increased $2.3 million, or 24%, to $11.9
million during the three months ended June 30, 2022, from $9.6 million during
the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was primarily attributable to
a $1.0 million increase in compensation expense, a $1.1 million increase in
professional service fees related to clinical trials, recruiting and consulting,
and a $0.2 million increase in stock-based compensation.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $19.1 million, or 30%, to
$81.8 million during the three months ended June 30, 2022, from $62.7 million
during the three months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was due to a $8.4
million
                                       30
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increase in compensation costs as a result of increased headcount and corporate
bonus, an increase of $4.3 million in stock based compensation expense, an
increase in professional service fees of $3.6 million and an increase in bad
debt expense of $2.6 million.

Interest Expense

Interest expense was $0.5 million for the three months ended June 30, 2022,
compared to $0.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021. There were no
significant changes in interest expense during the three months ended June 30,
2022, compared with the three months ended June 30, 2021.

Other income, net

Other income, net was immaterial for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and
2021. There were no significant changes in other income, net during the three
months ended June 30, 2022, compared with the three months ended June 30, 2021.

Comparison of the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

                                                           Six Months Ended June 30,
                                                          2022                     2021             $ Change             % Change

                                                                                  (dollars in thousands)
Revenue                                             $    194,429               $ 155,589          $  38,840                      25  %
Cost of revenue                                           62,425                  49,453             12,972                      26  %
Gross profit                                             132,004                 106,136             25,868                      24  %
Gross margin                                                  68   %                  68  %
Operating expenses:
Research and development                                  22,487                  18,116              4,371                      24  %
Selling, general and administrative                      154,909                 132,482             22,427                      17  %
Impairment and restructuring charges                      26,608                       -             26,608                     100  %
Total operating expenses                                 204,004                 150,598             53,406                      35  %
Loss from operations                                     (72,000)                (44,462)           (27,538)                     62  %
Interest expense                                          (2,511)                   (642)            (1,869)                    291  %
Other income, net                                             85                     179                (94)                    (53) %
Loss before income taxes                                 (74,426)                (44,925)           (29,501)                     66  %
Income tax provision                                          80                     214               (134)                    (63) %
Net loss                                            $    (74,506)              $ (45,139)         $ (29,367)                     65  %


Revenue

Revenue increased $38.8 million, or 25%, to $194.4 million during the six months
ended June 30, 2022 from $155.6 million during the six months ended June 30,
2021. The increase in revenue was primarily attributable to an increase in
volume of Zio services provided as a result of increased demand and improved CMS
reimbursement rates, partially offset by a decrease in adjudication performance
with contracted and non-contracted payors.

Revenue cost and gross profit

Cost of revenue increased $13.0 million, or 26%, to $62.4 million during the six
months ended June 30, 2022, from $49.5 million during the six months ended
June 30, 2021. The increase in cost of revenue was primarily due to increased
Zio service volume and higher costs associated with our new operating facility
in Cypress, California that commenced operation in September 2021.

Gross profit increased $25.9 million to $132.0 million during the six months
ended June 30, 2022 from $106.1 million during the six months ended June 30,
2021. The increase in gross profit was primarily due to increased volume and an
increase in net average selling price partially offset by higher cost per unit.
                                       31
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Research and development costs

Research and development expenses increased $4.4 million, or 24%, to $22.5
million during the six months ended June 30, 2022, from $18.1 million during the
six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was primarily attributable to a
$3.2 million increase in compensation costs as a result of increased headcount
and a $1.1 million increase in professional service fees related to clinical
trials, recruiting and consulting.

Selling, general and administrative expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $22.4 million, or 17%, to
$154.9 million during the six months ended June 30, 2022 from $132.5 million
during the six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase was due to a $15.7
million increase in compensation costs as a result of increased headcount, a
$4.1 million increase in professional service fees, and a $3.9 million increase
in bad debt expense partially offset by a $3.2 million decline in commissions
and $1.5 million decrease in stock-based compensation.

Impairment and restructuring charges

In February 2022, our board of directors (the "Board") approved reducing our
leased space for our headquarters in San Francisco, California. As a result, we
recognized an impairment of our right of use asset and related leasehold
improvements and furniture and fixtures in the amount of $23.2 million during
the six months ended June 30, 2022.

In February 2022, the board approved a restructuring plan to allow the Company
to effectively and efficiently scale its business. The 2022 Restructuring Plan
resulted in severance and other employment related costs. We recorded $3.4
million in charges under the 2022 Restructuring plan during the six months ended
June 30, 2022.

The Company did not incur any impairment and restructuring charges during the six months ended June 30, 2021.

Interest Expense

Interest expense was $2.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2022,
compared to $0.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The increase
was due to additional financing fees of $1.75 million related to our term loan
paid in March 2022.

Other Income, Net

Other income, net was $0.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2022,
compared to $0.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021. There were no
significant changes in other income, net during the six months ended June 30,
2022 compared with the six months ended June 30, 2021.

Cash and capital expenditure

Insight

We are continuously reviewing our liquidity and anticipated capital requirements
in light of the significant uncertainty created by the COVID-19 global pandemic.
We believe we will have adequate liquidity over the next twelve months to
operate our business and to meet our cash requirements.

From June 30, 2022we had cash and cash equivalents of $101.3 millionshort-term investments of $103.2 millionand a cumulative deficit of $480.6 million. In addition, we have term loan facilities of $40.0 million and a revolving line of credit of $25.0 million available.

Our expected future capital requirements may depend on many factors, including
expanding our customer base, the expansion of our sales force, and the timing
and extent of spending on the development of our technology to increase our
product offerings. We expect the next Verily milestone of $1.75 million to be
met in 2023. Additionally, we will complete the build out of our new Deerfield,
Illinois facility in the second half of 2022.

If we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders may
experience dilution. Any future debt financing into which we enter may impose
upon us additional covenants that restrict our operations, including limitations
on our ability to incur liens or additional debt, pay dividends, repurchase our
common stock, make certain investments and engage in certain merger,
consolidation or asset sale transactions. Any debt financing or additional
equity that we raise may contain terms that are not favorable to us or our
stockholders.
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Cash flow

The following table summarizes our cash flows for the periods indicated (in
thousands):

                                                                       Six months ended June 30,
                                                                       2022                   2021
Net cash (used in) provided by:
Operating activities                                             $      (39,257)         $   (42,385)
Investing activities                                                     (8,958)             118,737
Financing activities                                                     21,906              (26,108)
Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents             $      

(26,309) $50,244

Cash flows used in operating activities

During the six months ended June 30, 2022, cash used in operating activities was
$39.3 million, which consisted of a net loss of $74.5 million, adjusted by
non-cash charges of $96.3 million and a net change of $61.1 million in our net
operating assets and liabilities. The non-cash charges were primarily comprised
of impairment charges of $23.2 million, stock-based compensation expense of
$29.0 million, allowance for doubtful accounts and contractual allowances of
$29.2 million, depreciation and amortization of $6.5 million and amortization of
right of use assets of $7.9 million. The change in our net operating assets and
liabilities was primarily due to an increase of $40.2 million in accounts
receivable, an increase of $4.3 million in inventory, a decrease of $1.3 million
in accrued liabilities, a decrease of $4.5 million in accounts payable and a
decrease of $7.8 million in operating lease liability.

The number of claims from the first half of 2021 which contained differences
between the submitted price and reimbursement and overall denials increased
significantly compared to our historical experience as a result of CPT code
transition issues with the payors. We continue to work with the payors to
collect on these claims and the collection cycle for these claims is
significantly longer than usual. While we believe we have properly estimated the
impact to our contractual allowances and allowance for doubtful accounts, the
inherent uncertainty caused by longer collection cycle and claims adjudication
process could result in additional provisions for contractual allowances and
doubtful accounts which would negatively impact our results of operations in
future periods. As of June 30, 2022, uncollected claims as a result of the CPT
code transition were $10.7 million, net of contractual allowances. We believe we
have adequate balance sheet liquidity to manage through these delays

During the six months ended June 30, 2021, cash used in operating activities was
$42.4 million, which consisted of a net loss of $45.1 million, adjusted by
non-cash charges of $53.1 million and a net change of $50.3 million in our net
operating assets and liabilities. The non-cash charges were primarily comprised
of a change in stock-based compensation of $30.5 million, allowance for doubtful
accounts and contractual allowances of $14.2 million, depreciation and
amortization of $4.2 million and amortization of right of use assets of $3.2
million. The change in our net operating assets and liabilities was primarily
due to an increase of $47.7 million in accounts receivable, an increase of $4.0
million in inventory, a decrease of $2.0 million in accrued liabilities, an
increase of $1.9 million in accounts payable and a decrease of $2.6 million in
operating lease liability.

Cash provided by (used in) investing activities

Cash used in investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2022 was
$9.0 million, which primarily consisted of $91.5 million in purchases of
available for sale investments and $16.4 million of capital expenditures,
partially offset by cash received from the maturities of available for sale
investments of $64.0 million, and sales of available for sale investments of
$35.0 million.

Cash provided by investing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2021
was $118.7 million, which primarily consisted of cash received from the
maturities of available for sale investments of $175.3 million, partially offset
by $46.4 million in purchases of available for sale investments and $10.1
million of capital expenditures.
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Cash provided by (used in) fundraising activities

During the six months ended June 30, 2022, cash provided by financing activities
was $21.9 million, primarily due to $35.0 million in proceeds received from the
closing of our Second Amendment to our SVB Loan Agreement and $8.4 million of
proceeds from the issuance of common stock in connection with employee equity
incentive plans, partially offset by a $21.4 million repayment of the
outstanding balance under the existing SVB term loan.

During the six months ended June 30, 2021, cash used in financing activities was
$26.1 million, primarily due to $25.9 million in tax withholding upon the
vesting of RSUs. This practice has been updated to require employees to sell
shares to cover tax liabilities and has not been a use of company cash beginning
in June 2021. In addition, cash used in financing activities was due to
repayment of debt of $5.8 million, partially offset by $5.6 million in proceeds
from the issuance of common stock in connection with employee options exercises
and our Employee Stock Purchase Plan.

Bank debt

In October 2018, we entered into a Third Amended and Restated Loan and Security
Agreement with SVB ("SVB Loan Agreement"). Under the SVB Loan Agreement, we had
borrowed $35.0 million and had made repayments through March 2022 at which time
the outstanding balance was $18.5 million.

On March 28, 2022, we entered into a Second Amendment ("2022 Amendment") to the
SVB Loan Agreement which provided for a term loan facility in the aggregate
principal amount of up to $75.0 million (the "2022 Term Loans"), of which $35.0
million was borrowed at closing and a portion of the proceeds was used to pay in
full the outstanding balance of $18.5 million of the SVB Loan Agreement. The
remaining $40.0 million of 2022 Term Loans may be borrowed from time to time at
our option, in increments of at least $10.0 million, through December 31, 2023.
We will pay interest only on the 2022 Term Loans until April 1, 2025, when we
shall commence repaying the 2022 Term Loans in 24 equal consecutive monthly
installments, with all obligations under the 2022 Term Loans maturing on March
1, 2027. Interest charged on the 2022 Term Loans accrues at a floating per annum
rate equal to the greater of (A) the Prime Rate plus 0.25% and (B) 3.50%. We are
also required to pay fees on any prepayment of the 2022 Term Loans, ranging from
3.0% to 1.0% depending on the date of prepayment, and a final payment equal to
5.0% of the principal amount of the 2022 Term Loans made. Once repaid or
prepaid, the 2022 Term Loans may not be reborrowed.

The 2022 Amendment also amended the terms of the revolving credit line under the
SVB Loan Agreement, which provided for an aggregate principal amount of $25.0
million, to (i) extend the maturity date from August 1, 2023 to March 1, 2027,
(ii) increase the letters of credit sublimit to $15.0 million and (iii) increase
the cash management services sublimit to $15.0 million. Interest charged on the
principal amount outstanding under the revolving credit line shall accrue at a
floating per annum rate equal to the greater of (A) the Prime Rate plus 0.25%
and (B) 3.50%. We are required to pay an annual fee equal to 0.15% of the
revolving credit line. As of June 30, 2022, no loans were outstanding under the
revolving credit line.

Off-balance sheet arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements and do not hold any interests in variable interest entities.

Contractual obligations

Our contractual obligations from December 31, 2021are set forth in our Form 10-K filed with the SECOND on February 28, 2022. There have been no material changes.

Significant Accounting Policies and Estimates

For a complete description of what we believe to be the critical accounting
policies and estimates used in the preparation of our Unaudited Condensed
Consolidated Financial Statements, refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for
the year ended December 31, 2021 ("Annual Report"). Refer to Note 2. Summary of
Significant Accounting Policies, in the Notes to Unaudited Condensed
Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 1 of Part I of this Quarterly Report
on Form 10-Q, for all significant accounting policies. There have been no
significant changes to our critical accounting policies as described in our
Annual Report.



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